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Presentation Title

Micronutrient Supplementation in Pediactric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Examining Pedictors and Outcomes of Supplement Adherence

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Kaila Stephens '13Follow

Location

Meyer Auditorium

Abstract

This study examines biological and psychological predictors and outcomes of multivitamin, iron, and calcium adherence in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Mean adherence rates were 32% to 44%. Multivitamin knowledge and CRP levels accounted for 48% of the variance in multivitamin adherence. Iron knowledge and family involvement accounted for 50% of the variance in iron adherence. Calcium knowledge and family involvement accounted for 19% of the variance in calcium adherence. Calcium adherence predicted fewer abnormal CRP levels and fewer calcium-deficient labs. Iron adherence predicted fewer abnormal ESR levels. Psychological factors were more strongly associated with adherence than biological factors.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-9-2013 11:00 AM

End Date

4-9-2013 11:20 AM

Panel

Panel: Frontiers of the Human Body

Panel Moderator

Jennifer Jeziorski

Field of Study for Presentation

Biology

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Apr 9th, 11:00 AM Apr 9th, 11:20 AM

Micronutrient Supplementation in Pediactric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Examining Pedictors and Outcomes of Supplement Adherence

Meyer Auditorium

This study examines biological and psychological predictors and outcomes of multivitamin, iron, and calcium adherence in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Mean adherence rates were 32% to 44%. Multivitamin knowledge and CRP levels accounted for 48% of the variance in multivitamin adherence. Iron knowledge and family involvement accounted for 50% of the variance in iron adherence. Calcium knowledge and family involvement accounted for 19% of the variance in calcium adherence. Calcium adherence predicted fewer abnormal CRP levels and fewer calcium-deficient labs. Iron adherence predicted fewer abnormal ESR levels. Psychological factors were more strongly associated with adherence than biological factors.