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Presentation Title

Racial Differentiation of Multicultural Education

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Leticia Gelacio '15Follow

Location

Young 111

Abstract

The multicultural education movement of the last half century suggests that diversity and multiculturalism are valuable educational goals for the American society. Racially/ethnically homogeneous/segregated schools are urged to integrate diverse cultural experiences into their students’ education. As evident in the Brown v. Board Supreme Court desegregation decision, however, the value of multiculturalism differs across race/ethnicity. Multiculturalism for minorities often represent a necessary asset for assimilation and mobility while for the majority, it is an expression of goodwill to accommodate other cultures. This suggests that stereotypes of cultural superiority and inferiority persist in today’s notions of multiculturalism.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-9-2013 1:20 PM

End Date

4-9-2013 1:40 PM

Panel

Panel: Education, Experimentation and Society

Panel Moderator

Verena Bonitz

Field of Study for Presentation

Education

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Apr 9th, 1:20 PM Apr 9th, 1:40 PM

Racial Differentiation of Multicultural Education

Young 111

The multicultural education movement of the last half century suggests that diversity and multiculturalism are valuable educational goals for the American society. Racially/ethnically homogeneous/segregated schools are urged to integrate diverse cultural experiences into their students’ education. As evident in the Brown v. Board Supreme Court desegregation decision, however, the value of multiculturalism differs across race/ethnicity. Multiculturalism for minorities often represent a necessary asset for assimilation and mobility while for the majority, it is an expression of goodwill to accommodate other cultures. This suggests that stereotypes of cultural superiority and inferiority persist in today’s notions of multiculturalism.