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Presentation Title

The Adulthood Project: Exploration of Public Data Methodologies

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Nicholas Jordan, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Meyer Auditorium

Abstract

The Adulthood Project is a faculty-student research collaboration exploring American adulthood under the direction of Holly Swyers. The project is developing a mode of data collection and sharing, enabling undergraduate students to access and contribute to a public database. While public data sharing has raised some criticism, new methodologies have increased in popularity. Digital collaboration has been shown to increase public conversation within communities; it engages students in the challenges of descriptive problematization, and introduces them to the ethics of digital research. This paper will explore the benefits of public data methodologies through my undergraduate research.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-8-2014 10:40 AM

End Date

4-8-2014 12:00 PM

Panel

Panel: American Data: Cars, Sports, Friends, and Growing Up

Field of Study for Presentation

Sociology and Anthropology

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Apr 8th, 10:40 AM Apr 8th, 12:00 PM

The Adulthood Project: Exploration of Public Data Methodologies

Meyer Auditorium

The Adulthood Project is a faculty-student research collaboration exploring American adulthood under the direction of Holly Swyers. The project is developing a mode of data collection and sharing, enabling undergraduate students to access and contribute to a public database. While public data sharing has raised some criticism, new methodologies have increased in popularity. Digital collaboration has been shown to increase public conversation within communities; it engages students in the challenges of descriptive problematization, and introduces them to the ethics of digital research. This paper will explore the benefits of public data methodologies through my undergraduate research.