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Presentation Title

Driven: Cultural Change in Reasons for Driving in the United States

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Samantha Molinaro, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Meyer Auditorium

Abstract

Media has recently reported that young Americans are less interested in driving than previous generations, citing technology, social media, and graduated licensing procedures as reasons. While the licensing rate is decreasing, explanations such as expense and time are neglected in media accounts. Interviews reveal that Millennials obtain their licenses to fulfill responsibilities, whereas Generation X, Baby Boom, and Silent Generation interviewees express that driving was expected. I contend that in the 20th century, driving became hegemonic, and in the 21st century, driving is becoming more ideological. Millennials are driving towards change, and media accounts reflect anxiety over such change.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-8-2014 10:40 AM

End Date

4-8-2014 12:00 PM

Panel

Panel: American Data: Cars, Sports, Friends, and Growing Up

Field of Study for Presentation

Sociology and Anthropology

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Apr 8th, 10:40 AM Apr 8th, 12:00 PM

Driven: Cultural Change in Reasons for Driving in the United States

Meyer Auditorium

Media has recently reported that young Americans are less interested in driving than previous generations, citing technology, social media, and graduated licensing procedures as reasons. While the licensing rate is decreasing, explanations such as expense and time are neglected in media accounts. Interviews reveal that Millennials obtain their licenses to fulfill responsibilities, whereas Generation X, Baby Boom, and Silent Generation interviewees express that driving was expected. I contend that in the 20th century, driving became hegemonic, and in the 21st century, driving is becoming more ideological. Millennials are driving towards change, and media accounts reflect anxiety over such change.