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Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Zhiyu Deng '15, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Durand Art Institute, 2nd Floor Balcony

Abstract

Methylmercury is a neurotoxin. The mechanisms of mercury methylation have been largely unknown until hgcA and hgcB were reported as required genes recently. It is important to characterize potential sources of the methyl groups used in methylation. Experimental data suggests that hgcA and hgcB are correlated with the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. We tested this hypothesis by looking for homologs in the methylators. CH3THF may be a methyl source since three related genes in the acetyl-CoA pathway showed up consistently in bacterial methylators. These genes do not consistently appear in methanogenic archaea; we speculate tetrahydromethanopterin may serve as a methyl donor.

Faculty Sponsors: Dr. Alexander Johs and Dr. Jerry M. Parks, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-8-2014 2:40 PM

End Date

4-8-2014 4:00 PM

Panel

Posters: The Ken Weik Poster Session

Field of Study for Presentation

Neuroscience

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Apr 8th, 2:40 PM Apr 8th, 4:00 PM

Comprehensive Bioinformatics Survey of Metabolic Pathways Related to Two Genes Required for Mercury Methylation

Durand Art Institute, 2nd Floor Balcony

Methylmercury is a neurotoxin. The mechanisms of mercury methylation have been largely unknown until hgcA and hgcB were reported as required genes recently. It is important to characterize potential sources of the methyl groups used in methylation. Experimental data suggests that hgcA and hgcB are correlated with the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. We tested this hypothesis by looking for homologs in the methylators. CH3THF may be a methyl source since three related genes in the acetyl-CoA pathway showed up consistently in bacterial methylators. These genes do not consistently appear in methanogenic archaea; we speculate tetrahydromethanopterin may serve as a methyl donor.

Faculty Sponsors: Dr. Alexander Johs and Dr. Jerry M. Parks, Oak Ridge National Laboratory