Complete Schedule of Events

Off-campus Lake Forest College users: To download documents with restricted access, please use the following link to log in to our proxy server with your university username and password.

Non-Lake Forest College users: Please talk to your librarian about requesting this document through interlibrary loan.

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Tyler Kaplan '16, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Durand Art Institute, 2nd Floor Balcony

Abstract

Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. During DNA replication, chromosomes cannot be completely copied, causing telomeres to shorten over time. Shortened telomeres are characteristic in cellular abnormalities such as cancer. However, the enzyme telomerase lengthens telomeres to prevent crucial genetic material from being removed. In our lab, we use the model organism, Aspergillus nidulans, because of its short, highly regulated telomeres. Our lab developed a telomere-anchored PCR-assay to measure telomere length in A. nidulans. This semester, I am determining if this assay can be applied to other organisms, starting with A. oryzae.

Presentation Type

Restricted Poster: Campus only access

Start Date

4-8-2014 2:40 PM

End Date

4-8-2014 4:00 PM

Panel

Posters: The Ken Weik Poster Session

Field of Study for Presentation

Biology

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 8th, 2:40 PM Apr 8th, 4:00 PM

Applying a Novel Telomere-anchored PCR assay to a New Organism

Durand Art Institute, 2nd Floor Balcony

Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. During DNA replication, chromosomes cannot be completely copied, causing telomeres to shorten over time. Shortened telomeres are characteristic in cellular abnormalities such as cancer. However, the enzyme telomerase lengthens telomeres to prevent crucial genetic material from being removed. In our lab, we use the model organism, Aspergillus nidulans, because of its short, highly regulated telomeres. Our lab developed a telomere-anchored PCR-assay to measure telomere length in A. nidulans. This semester, I am determining if this assay can be applied to other organisms, starting with A. oryzae.