2015 - 18th Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

Determining the end nucleotide of Apsergillus nidulans telomeres

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Zhiyu (Wendy) Deng, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Meyer Auditorium

Abstract

Telomeres, DNA-protein complexes at the ends of chromosomes, protect the genetic information from being lost during replication. Telomerase is the enzyme that elongates the telomeres. The DNA part of telomeres is composed of repeats of nucleotide units. In our lab we use Aspergillus nidulans, a filamentous fungus, as a model organism because of its extraordinarily short telomeres. Its telomeric repeats are TTAGGG, but we do not know which is the end nucleotide. We are interested in determining this nucleotide to better understand the activity of telomerase. Our lab developed a novel technique to amplify and measure the length of telomeres in A. nidulans using telomere-anchored end-point PCR. All six permutations exist in A. nidulans. Now we are figuring out techniques setting up the reactions and making control primers for qPCR, and our goal is to use qPCR to quantitatively measure which end nucleotide is the most abundant. Our approach to the problem and the results will be presented.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-7-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

4-7-2015 10:15 AM

Panel

Scientific Studies

Panel Moderator

Naomi Wentworth

Field of Study for Presentation

Biology

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Apr 7th, 9:00 AM Apr 7th, 10:15 AM

Determining the end nucleotide of Apsergillus nidulans telomeres

Meyer Auditorium

Telomeres, DNA-protein complexes at the ends of chromosomes, protect the genetic information from being lost during replication. Telomerase is the enzyme that elongates the telomeres. The DNA part of telomeres is composed of repeats of nucleotide units. In our lab we use Aspergillus nidulans, a filamentous fungus, as a model organism because of its extraordinarily short telomeres. Its telomeric repeats are TTAGGG, but we do not know which is the end nucleotide. We are interested in determining this nucleotide to better understand the activity of telomerase. Our lab developed a novel technique to amplify and measure the length of telomeres in A. nidulans using telomere-anchored end-point PCR. All six permutations exist in A. nidulans. Now we are figuring out techniques setting up the reactions and making control primers for qPCR, and our goal is to use qPCR to quantitatively measure which end nucleotide is the most abundant. Our approach to the problem and the results will be presented.