2015 - 18th Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

Urban ant community composition and morphology

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Jeremy Boeing '15, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Library 221

Abstract

Cities are the fastest growing environment in the world today. As cities increase in size, they replace the existing natural environment. Traditionally, urban centers have been thought of as a homogenized environment supporting few species. But, cities may be thought of as an urban mosaic comprised of many small microhabitats that attempt to mimic surrounding natural environments. Using ants as a representative species, I am comparing community and morphological differences between three urban microhabitats designed to mimic the displaced natural environment; green rooftops, street medians, and parks. These microhabitats provide suitable environments to support many native species and morphologies.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-7-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

4-7-2015 11:45 AM

Panel

The Nature of Nature

Panel Moderator

Carol Gayle

Field of Study for Presentation

Biology

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Apr 7th, 10:30 AM Apr 7th, 11:45 AM

Urban ant community composition and morphology

Library 221

Cities are the fastest growing environment in the world today. As cities increase in size, they replace the existing natural environment. Traditionally, urban centers have been thought of as a homogenized environment supporting few species. But, cities may be thought of as an urban mosaic comprised of many small microhabitats that attempt to mimic surrounding natural environments. Using ants as a representative species, I am comparing community and morphological differences between three urban microhabitats designed to mimic the displaced natural environment; green rooftops, street medians, and parks. These microhabitats provide suitable environments to support many native species and morphologies.