2015 - 18th Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

Do Measures of Growth Instituted by No Child Left Behind Effectively Capture Student Improvement?

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Alexis Yusim, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Library 221

Abstract

In this presentation, I will examine the extent to which school and community characteristics affect growth in student performance, using various definitions of growth over the period of No Child Left Behind. The act encouraged student improvement and success across demographic groups and overall, measured by the use of growth in standardized test scores. Using data from the Illinois State Board of Education over the period of No Child Left Behind, I argue that there are other ways to re-define growth and student success that more effectively capture NCLB's goals. Definitions include the percentage point change in the pass rate of a district, percent gain in the pass rate of a district, the percent of the achievement gap closed, and the change in a district's high school graduation rate. I also measure these over various racial subgroups of the population.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-7-2015 1:00 PM

End Date

4-7-2015 2:15 PM

Panel

Topics in Social Science Research: Education and Race

Panel Moderator

Todd Beer

Field of Study for Presentation

Economics, Education

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Apr 7th, 1:00 PM Apr 7th, 2:15 PM

Do Measures of Growth Instituted by No Child Left Behind Effectively Capture Student Improvement?

Library 221

In this presentation, I will examine the extent to which school and community characteristics affect growth in student performance, using various definitions of growth over the period of No Child Left Behind. The act encouraged student improvement and success across demographic groups and overall, measured by the use of growth in standardized test scores. Using data from the Illinois State Board of Education over the period of No Child Left Behind, I argue that there are other ways to re-define growth and student success that more effectively capture NCLB's goals. Definitions include the percentage point change in the pass rate of a district, percent gain in the pass rate of a district, the percent of the achievement gap closed, and the change in a district's high school graduation rate. I also measure these over various racial subgroups of the population.