2016 - 19th Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

Effects of Repeated Concussive Traumatic Brain Injury at Acute and Chronic Time Points

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Sarah G. Chiren, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Library First Floor

Abstract

Traumatic brain injuries (TBI), particularly concussions from sports or combat, are increasingly common and thought to increase the likelihood of neurodegenerative diseases, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy. The sequence of degenerative/regenerative responses underlying these disorders has been unclear and was the focus of this study. We utilized a controlled cortical impactor to deliver injury to rats. Our results indicate that there was neuronal cell loss in specific regions of the hippocampus. Additionally, there was a decrease in hippocampal and corpus callosal volume and an increase in ventricular size. Future studies will examine the use of rabies viral vectors to enhance regeneration.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-5-2016 2:30 PM

End Date

4-5-2016 3:45 PM

Panel

Trauma Studies of the Brain and Body

Panel Moderator

Siobhan Moroney

Field of Study for Presentation

Biology, Neuroscience

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Apr 5th, 2:30 PM Apr 5th, 3:45 PM

Effects of Repeated Concussive Traumatic Brain Injury at Acute and Chronic Time Points

Library First Floor

Traumatic brain injuries (TBI), particularly concussions from sports or combat, are increasingly common and thought to increase the likelihood of neurodegenerative diseases, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy. The sequence of degenerative/regenerative responses underlying these disorders has been unclear and was the focus of this study. We utilized a controlled cortical impactor to deliver injury to rats. Our results indicate that there was neuronal cell loss in specific regions of the hippocampus. Additionally, there was a decrease in hippocampal and corpus callosal volume and an increase in ventricular size. Future studies will examine the use of rabies viral vectors to enhance regeneration.