2016 - 19th Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

Collaborative Chemical Analysis of Soils from the Charnley-Persky House Archaeological Project

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Darya (Dasha) A. Rodina, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Library Basement

Abstract

The Charnley-Persky House became a site of archaeological curiosity after artifacts were found adjacent to the structure during excavations in 2010 and 2015. But why was there a significant amount of garbage deposited next to this elite residence? Using pH chemical analysis of the soil, we narrowed down the spectra of further chemical techniques, including methods to determine the amount of phosphorus in the soil (a marker of food consumption and deposition). Interpreted in concert with the documentary record, these chemical analytical methods can determine the nature of collected soil and the deposit, providing insight into the everyday routines of people who lived there in 19th century.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-5-2016 9:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2016 10:15 AM

Panel

Unearthing the Past

Panel Moderator

Carol Gayle

Field of Study for Presentation

Chemistry, History, Sociology and Anthropology, Urban Studies

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Apr 5th, 9:00 AM Apr 5th, 10:15 AM

Collaborative Chemical Analysis of Soils from the Charnley-Persky House Archaeological Project

Library Basement

The Charnley-Persky House became a site of archaeological curiosity after artifacts were found adjacent to the structure during excavations in 2010 and 2015. But why was there a significant amount of garbage deposited next to this elite residence? Using pH chemical analysis of the soil, we narrowed down the spectra of further chemical techniques, including methods to determine the amount of phosphorus in the soil (a marker of food consumption and deposition). Interpreted in concert with the documentary record, these chemical analytical methods can determine the nature of collected soil and the deposit, providing insight into the everyday routines of people who lived there in 19th century.