2016 - 19th Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

The Effects of Probe Sequencing on Microarray Gene Expression Measurements

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Kevin W. Kupiec, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Meyer Auditorium

Abstract

Deoxyribonucleic acid, otherwise known as DNA, is a molecule within each human cell that carries and stores the genetic information necessary to procreate and sustain life. Birth defects and particular diseases can be traced back to specific DNA sequences. Probe sequencing is the process of matching single-stranded DNA or RNA sequences to perfectly match and represent an mRNA sequence of DNA and is used to connect human maladies to DNA sequences. In this research project, we used biostatistical methods to analyze data to determine whether the number of nucleotide base pairs has an effect on gene expression measurements. The results and implications of our analyses will be presented.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-5-2016 9:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2016 10:15 AM

Panel

Genomics, Biostatistics, and Predictive Medicine

Panel Moderator

Cathy Benton

Field of Study for Presentation

Biology, Mathematics

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Apr 5th, 9:00 AM Apr 5th, 10:15 AM

The Effects of Probe Sequencing on Microarray Gene Expression Measurements

Meyer Auditorium

Deoxyribonucleic acid, otherwise known as DNA, is a molecule within each human cell that carries and stores the genetic information necessary to procreate and sustain life. Birth defects and particular diseases can be traced back to specific DNA sequences. Probe sequencing is the process of matching single-stranded DNA or RNA sequences to perfectly match and represent an mRNA sequence of DNA and is used to connect human maladies to DNA sequences. In this research project, we used biostatistical methods to analyze data to determine whether the number of nucleotide base pairs has an effect on gene expression measurements. The results and implications of our analyses will be presented.