2016 - 19th Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

Investigation of the effect of repetitive eye movements on episodic memory

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Belen Martinez-Caro Aguado, LakeForest CollegeFollow

Location

Meyer Auditorium

Abstract

Previous studies show that making horizontal eye movements for thirty seconds prior to a memory task improves performance for right-handed participants. Two theories explain this phenomenon from conflicting perspectives: the inter-hemispheric interaction hypothesis claims the eye movements increase interaction between hemispheres, whereas the top-down attentional control hypothesis claims they improve top-down attentional control which in turn improves episodic memory retrieval. The current study tests these competing theories by investigating the effect of vertical, horizontal, and no-eye movement tasks on the ability of participants to remember words requiring little effort (bottom-up processing) or requiring more significant cognitive effort (top-down processing).

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-5-2016 2:30 PM

End Date

4-5-2016 3:45 PM

Panel

Mind your Eyes and Cues

Panel Moderator

Linda Horwitz

Field of Study for Presentation

Psychology

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Apr 5th, 2:30 PM Apr 5th, 3:45 PM

Investigation of the effect of repetitive eye movements on episodic memory

Meyer Auditorium

Previous studies show that making horizontal eye movements for thirty seconds prior to a memory task improves performance for right-handed participants. Two theories explain this phenomenon from conflicting perspectives: the inter-hemispheric interaction hypothesis claims the eye movements increase interaction between hemispheres, whereas the top-down attentional control hypothesis claims they improve top-down attentional control which in turn improves episodic memory retrieval. The current study tests these competing theories by investigating the effect of vertical, horizontal, and no-eye movement tasks on the ability of participants to remember words requiring little effort (bottom-up processing) or requiring more significant cognitive effort (top-down processing).