2016 - 19th Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

Uncovering Gold in the Gold Coast: Digging for Clues about Class Relations (from Chicago’s Charnley-Persky House Excavation, July 2015)

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Xhris R. Fitzgerald, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Library Basement

Abstract

Did the Gilded Age of the late-19th/early-20th centuries influence contemporary views of class and status? Following a presentation at the Midwest Historical Archaeology Conference (October 2015) with Anne Marie Brugioni (’16), I will present findings from a summer 2015 excavation of the Charnley-Persky House in Chicago’s Gold Coast neighborhood, as part of the College’s Archaeological Field School. Excavation findings suggest that the site’s material culture relations were more dynamic than previously assumed. From the findings, we can also see that notions of class and status in contemporary America are far more complex than many people believe them to be.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-5-2016 9:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2016 10:15 AM

Panel

Unearthing the Past

Panel Moderator

Carol Gayle

Field of Study for Presentation

American Studies, History, Sociology and Anthropology, Urban Studies

No downloadable materials are available for this event.

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Apr 5th, 9:00 AM Apr 5th, 10:15 AM

Uncovering Gold in the Gold Coast: Digging for Clues about Class Relations (from Chicago’s Charnley-Persky House Excavation, July 2015)

Library Basement

Did the Gilded Age of the late-19th/early-20th centuries influence contemporary views of class and status? Following a presentation at the Midwest Historical Archaeology Conference (October 2015) with Anne Marie Brugioni (’16), I will present findings from a summer 2015 excavation of the Charnley-Persky House in Chicago’s Gold Coast neighborhood, as part of the College’s Archaeological Field School. Excavation findings suggest that the site’s material culture relations were more dynamic than previously assumed. From the findings, we can also see that notions of class and status in contemporary America are far more complex than many people believe them to be.