2016 - 19th Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

Life stories of therianthropes: An analysis of nonhuman identity in a narrative identity model.

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Natalie Bricker, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Library First Floor

Abstract

Therianthropy is the phenomenon in which a person identifies in varying degrees as a nonhuman animal. The goal of the present research was to investigate therianthropic identities through the lens of Dan McAdams’s life story model of identity. Self-identified therianthropes were interviewed with an adaptation of McAdams’s Life Story Interview. These interviews were analyzed using grounded theory methodology in order to determine common themes among the life stories of therianthropes and to elucidate how these common experiences contribute to the development and maintenance of a nonhuman identity. This study focused on young adult individuals in order to fit these findings into existing literature pertaining to emerging adulthood.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-5-2016 10:30 AM

End Date

4-5-2016 11:45 AM

Panel

Thinking About Differences

Panel Moderator

Susan Long

Field of Study for Presentation

Psychology

No downloadable materials are available for this event.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 5th, 10:30 AM Apr 5th, 11:45 AM

Life stories of therianthropes: An analysis of nonhuman identity in a narrative identity model.

Library First Floor

Therianthropy is the phenomenon in which a person identifies in varying degrees as a nonhuman animal. The goal of the present research was to investigate therianthropic identities through the lens of Dan McAdams’s life story model of identity. Self-identified therianthropes were interviewed with an adaptation of McAdams’s Life Story Interview. These interviews were analyzed using grounded theory methodology in order to determine common themes among the life stories of therianthropes and to elucidate how these common experiences contribute to the development and maintenance of a nonhuman identity. This study focused on young adult individuals in order to fit these findings into existing literature pertaining to emerging adulthood.