2016 - 19th Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

Does starvation affect the telomere length in Aspergillus nidulans?

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Junya Li, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Mohr Walkway

Abstract

Telomeres protect the ends of chromosomes from degradation and fusion, and play a critical role in cell proliferation. Telomeres can be shortened by a variety of mechanisms, leading to chromosomal instability and loss of cell viability. In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, telomeres are exceptionally short and this length is unchanged throughout its life cycle. I now am investigating whether starvation affects telomeric length or the specific nucleotide found at the terminus. My results indicate no significant difference in the telomere lengths and the end nucleotide in the DNA of non-starved and starved fungi. These findings suggest filamentous fungi have extraordinarily tight regulatory control of telomere length in this organism.

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-5-2016 10:30 AM

End Date

4-5-2016 11:45 AM

Panel

Poster Session

Panel Moderator

Karen Kirk

Field of Study for Presentation

Biology

No downloadable materials are available for this event.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 5th, 10:30 AM Apr 5th, 11:45 AM

Does starvation affect the telomere length in Aspergillus nidulans?

Mohr Walkway

Telomeres protect the ends of chromosomes from degradation and fusion, and play a critical role in cell proliferation. Telomeres can be shortened by a variety of mechanisms, leading to chromosomal instability and loss of cell viability. In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, telomeres are exceptionally short and this length is unchanged throughout its life cycle. I now am investigating whether starvation affects telomeric length or the specific nucleotide found at the terminus. My results indicate no significant difference in the telomere lengths and the end nucleotide in the DNA of non-starved and starved fungi. These findings suggest filamentous fungi have extraordinarily tight regulatory control of telomere length in this organism.