2017 - 20th Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

The Impact of Political Structure and Governmental Organization on Economic Development

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Maja Torlo, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Library Basement

Abstract

Liberal democratic countries in the West employ a variety of mechanisms to encourage authoritarian regimes to embrace liberal democratic governance, arguing that political freedoms best ensure domestic tranquility and prosperity. In recent time especially, however, some new democracies have struggled economically whereas some authoritarian regimes have seen sustained and impressive rates of economic growth and higher development. This paper rejects the notion that economic performance is a function of regime type, with democracies outperforming autocracies. It argues instead that a country’s economic development is result of a specific set of political elements and government activities – not regime type per se.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-11-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

4-11-2017 10:15 AM

Panel

International Economic Development

Panel Moderator

Evan Oxman

Field of Study for Presentation

Economics, International Relations

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Apr 11th, 9:00 AM Apr 11th, 10:15 AM

The Impact of Political Structure and Governmental Organization on Economic Development

Library Basement

Liberal democratic countries in the West employ a variety of mechanisms to encourage authoritarian regimes to embrace liberal democratic governance, arguing that political freedoms best ensure domestic tranquility and prosperity. In recent time especially, however, some new democracies have struggled economically whereas some authoritarian regimes have seen sustained and impressive rates of economic growth and higher development. This paper rejects the notion that economic performance is a function of regime type, with democracies outperforming autocracies. It argues instead that a country’s economic development is result of a specific set of political elements and government activities – not regime type per se.