2017 - 20th Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

Decision-Making during Times of Crisis

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Marcel Tatum, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Library First Floor

Abstract

Despite vast research on political behavior after the occurrence of a crisis, little is known about the changes in politician’s’ behavior during the crisis. Research shows that polarization and extremism are typical aftermaths of a crisis, but is this polarization reflected in the behavior of politicians during a crisis? This paper explores the changes in the behavior of those serving in the US House of Representatives following the events of September 11, 2001. Prospect theory suggests that representatives become more risk seeking during a time of crisis and are therefore more likely to vote differently than their party. This is confirmed through regression analyses that show representatives were less likely to vote along party lines in the nine months preceding the attacks. Bipartisan support for legislation however did not increase, indicating that individual behavior was influenced to a greater extent than party behavior.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-11-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

4-11-2017 2:15 PM

Panel

Contemporary Issues

Panel Moderator

Ken Davis

Field of Study for Presentation

Economics

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Apr 11th, 1:00 PM Apr 11th, 2:15 PM

Decision-Making during Times of Crisis

Library First Floor

Despite vast research on political behavior after the occurrence of a crisis, little is known about the changes in politician’s’ behavior during the crisis. Research shows that polarization and extremism are typical aftermaths of a crisis, but is this polarization reflected in the behavior of politicians during a crisis? This paper explores the changes in the behavior of those serving in the US House of Representatives following the events of September 11, 2001. Prospect theory suggests that representatives become more risk seeking during a time of crisis and are therefore more likely to vote differently than their party. This is confirmed through regression analyses that show representatives were less likely to vote along party lines in the nine months preceding the attacks. Bipartisan support for legislation however did not increase, indicating that individual behavior was influenced to a greater extent than party behavior.