Class Year

2017

Date

4-25-2017

Document Type

Thesis

Distinguished Thesis

Yes

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Department or Program

Psychology

Second Department or Program

Neuroscience

First Advisor

Nancy Brekke

Second Advisor

Sergio Guglielmi

Third Advisor

Lukasz Konopka

Abstract

Researchers have posited that implicit racial bias is rooted in social categorization, and could therefore be reduced by targeting categorization processes. Two models have shown promise: Common Ingroup Identity, whereby members of different groups come to see themselves as one group, and Dual Identity, whereby members of different groups maintain their group identities, while creating a superordinate identity. Because previous researchers often did more than instruct participants to categorize differently, however, one cannot be sure that the observed effects resulted from categorization changes. This study’s purpose was to determine whether manipulating the way people categorize social stimuli is sufficient to reduce bias, and if so, to identify which model is most effective. Categorization was manipulated by randomly assigning participants to complete one of four Go/No-Go reaction time tasks. Implicit bias was measured using the Implicit Association Test. Results suggest that manipulating social categorization alone does not reduce implicit racial bias.

Language

English


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