Class Year

2017

Date

4-6-2017

Document Type

Thesis

Distinguished Thesis

Yes

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Department or Program

Biology

First Advisor

Lynn Westley

Second Advisor

Greg Silsbe, University of Maryland, Center for Environmental Science

Third Advisor

Scott Schappe

Fourth Advisor

Karen Kirk

Abstract

In coastal and estuarine waters, high turbidity and land interference severely diminish the utility of satellite data. This study tested the accuracy of hyperspectral inversion algorithms to better resolve chlorophyll a estimates in the Chesapeake Bay. Hyperspectral instruments measure reflected light with much greater spectral resolution than the multispectral instruments currently deployed on ocean-observing satellites. Increased spectral resolution allows for better approximation of phytoplankton concentrations in optically complex waters. This research seeks to test optical inversion algorithms designed for turbid waters like the Chesapeake Bay. By pairing in situ measurements of chlorophyll with electromagnetic spectrum measurements, we determined the most accurate algorithms for use in the Chesapeake Bay. These algorithms can then be employed in future remote sensing studies to yield accurate chlorophyll measurements in fine temporal, and spatial time scales.

Language

English


Share

COinS