Class Year

2014

Date

4-15-2014

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Department or Program

Psychology

First Advisor

Matthew R. Kelley

Second Advisor

Chloe Johnston

Third Advisor

Susan M. Long

Abstract

Collaborative inhibition is defined as reduced memory performance when people collaborate in a group as compared to a non-collaborating (nominal) group of individuals. Collaborative inhibition is a robust effect that has been widely replicated; moreover, it has proven very difficult to attenuate or eliminate this effect. The present study was designed to determine whether collaborative inhibition persists in a situation where collaboration is central to the creation of the to-be-remembered stimuli. Across two experiments, participants were asked to improvise conversations/scenes and then recall them individually or collaboratively. Results and implications will be discussed.


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Psychology Commons

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