Class Year

2016

Date

4-15-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Department or Program

Psychology

Second Department or Program

Neuroscience

First Advisor

Matthew Kelley

Second Advisor

Kathryn Dohrmann

Third Advisor

Anne E. Houde

Abstract

Part-set cueing describes the phenomenon in which the presence of cues (i.e., part of the set of to-be-recalled information) influences recall. Part-set cuing inhibition, in particular, describes the presence of cues resulting in a lower performance in recall tasks. The generation effect refers to the finding that, when people are actively involved in creating or generating to-be-recalled information (e.g., solving the fragment, “madne_s” to “madness”), they tend to remember that information better than when that information is merely read. Only a few studies have examined the joint influence of part-set cueing and generation, and these studies have not produced consistent results. The present two experiments explored this combination of variables. Both experiments showed that the magnitude of part-set cueing inhibition did not differ across the read and generated conditions. The implications of these results with present theories of part-set cueing are discussed.


Share

COinS