Class Year

2016

Date

4-20-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Distinguished Thesis

Yes

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Department or Program

Psychology

First Advisor

Naomi Wentworth

Second Advisor

Matthew R. Kelley

Third Advisor

Carolyn Tuttle

Abstract

Previous studies show that making horizontal eye movements for thirty seconds prior to a memory task improves performance for right-handed participants. Two theories explain this phenomenon from conflicting perspectives: the inter-hemispheric interaction hypothesis claims eye movements increase interaction between hemispheres, whereas the top-down attentional control hypothesis claims they improve top-down attentional control subsequently improving episodic memory retrieval. The current study tests these theories by investigating the effect of vertical, horizontal, and no-eye movements on the ability of participants to remember words requiring little effort (bottom-up processing) or more significant cognitive effort (top-down). Results did not replicate eye movements improving episodic memory. This may be due to it being a small effect that may require a larger sample size to show.


Included in

Psychology Commons

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