Presentation Title

Localization Mechanism of Telomerase in Aspergillus nidulans

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Karen KirkFollow
Junya Li, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Location

Lilliard Science Center A 044

Abstract

Telomeres are DNA-protein complexes at the ends of chromosomes that protect the termini from degradation and fusion. The enzyme complex, telomerase, consists of the TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase) and the TER (telomerase RNA), and maintains the length of telomeres. Our lab has been studying where in the cell these two components assemble in Aspergillus nidulans, a filamentous fungus that can exhibit a multi-nucleate state known as heterokaryon. Preliminary evidence using heterokaryons suggests that TER does not leave the nucleus. I am now studying where TERT localizes by knocking out the gene. To accomplish this, I amplified TERT left and right DNA flanking fragments and fused them with a genetic marker in between. I will use this genetic marker to transform A. nidulans and create a TERT knockout strain. By analyzing the obtained knockout strain, I hope to gain insight into the localization mechanism of TERT in A. nidulans, and to compare this to the localization of TER. These studies will help reveal how the components of this essential protein complex find each other and are maintained.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-10-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

4-10-2018 11:45 AM

Panel

Scientific Studies

Field of Study for Presentation

Biology

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Apr 10th, 10:30 AM Apr 10th, 11:45 AM

Localization Mechanism of Telomerase in Aspergillus nidulans

Lilliard Science Center A 044

Telomeres are DNA-protein complexes at the ends of chromosomes that protect the termini from degradation and fusion. The enzyme complex, telomerase, consists of the TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase) and the TER (telomerase RNA), and maintains the length of telomeres. Our lab has been studying where in the cell these two components assemble in Aspergillus nidulans, a filamentous fungus that can exhibit a multi-nucleate state known as heterokaryon. Preliminary evidence using heterokaryons suggests that TER does not leave the nucleus. I am now studying where TERT localizes by knocking out the gene. To accomplish this, I amplified TERT left and right DNA flanking fragments and fused them with a genetic marker in between. I will use this genetic marker to transform A. nidulans and create a TERT knockout strain. By analyzing the obtained knockout strain, I hope to gain insight into the localization mechanism of TERT in A. nidulans, and to compare this to the localization of TER. These studies will help reveal how the components of this essential protein complex find each other and are maintained.