Presentation Title

¿Quién decide? Gender, power, culture, and birth control decisions

Location

Library Basement

Abstract

Decisions regarding the use of contraceptive methods have been associated with a variety of social, economic, and cultural factors that are relevant to heterosexual Latinx populations. Acculturation, for instance, is a process that can impact an individual’s adherence to the values of their culture of origin or ethnic identification and, thus, it has the potential to influence birth control use. It can also be useful to explore power distribution, and the acceptance of such within a society, in order to establish more detailed differences within distinct cultural Latinx groups. Additionally, determining imbalances at an interpersonal or relationship level should be a primary focus in order to understand how young adults in sexual relationships decide which birth control method(s) to use. More specifically, expressions of Machismo and Marianismo serve as a platform for framing gender roles expectations within Latinx cultures. Thus, this research examines the interplay of culture, acceptance of power, adherence to the gender role constructs of Machismo and Marianismo, and the decision-making process regarding the use of contraception methods, particular within participants from Ecuador, the United States, and Venezuela.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-10-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

4-10-2018 10:15 AM

Panel

Cultural Oppression

Field of Study for Presentation

Psychology, Women's and Gender Studies, Latin American Studies

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Apr 10th, 9:00 AM Apr 10th, 10:15 AM

¿Quién decide? Gender, power, culture, and birth control decisions

Library Basement

Decisions regarding the use of contraceptive methods have been associated with a variety of social, economic, and cultural factors that are relevant to heterosexual Latinx populations. Acculturation, for instance, is a process that can impact an individual’s adherence to the values of their culture of origin or ethnic identification and, thus, it has the potential to influence birth control use. It can also be useful to explore power distribution, and the acceptance of such within a society, in order to establish more detailed differences within distinct cultural Latinx groups. Additionally, determining imbalances at an interpersonal or relationship level should be a primary focus in order to understand how young adults in sexual relationships decide which birth control method(s) to use. More specifically, expressions of Machismo and Marianismo serve as a platform for framing gender roles expectations within Latinx cultures. Thus, this research examines the interplay of culture, acceptance of power, adherence to the gender role constructs of Machismo and Marianismo, and the decision-making process regarding the use of contraception methods, particular within participants from Ecuador, the United States, and Venezuela.