2019 - 22nd Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

Proximate Mechanisms and Ultimate Functions: An Integrative Study of Evolutionary Tradeoffs in Bean Beetles

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Sam A. Gascoigne, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Department or Major

Biology

Location

Lillard Lobby

Abstract

Life history theory argues that organisms have a finite “energy budget” for survival and reproduction, and that tradeoffs arise through differential investment over time. However, while many studies report tradeoffs, there is little understanding as to the contexts in which they occur. The bean beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus, has two morphs: flightless (atrophied wings) and dispersal (functional wings). As developing wings is energetically expensive, we predict that the occurrence of tradeoffs will depend on the morph. We will measure behavioral, life history, and morphological traits to generate a holistic model of tradeoffs and to understand the causes and consequences of tradeoffs in each morph.

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-9-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

4-9-2019 2:15 PM

Panel

Poster Session

Field of Study for Presentation

Biology

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM Apr 9th, 2:15 PM

Proximate Mechanisms and Ultimate Functions: An Integrative Study of Evolutionary Tradeoffs in Bean Beetles

Lillard Lobby

Life history theory argues that organisms have a finite “energy budget” for survival and reproduction, and that tradeoffs arise through differential investment over time. However, while many studies report tradeoffs, there is little understanding as to the contexts in which they occur. The bean beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus, has two morphs: flightless (atrophied wings) and dispersal (functional wings). As developing wings is energetically expensive, we predict that the occurrence of tradeoffs will depend on the morph. We will measure behavioral, life history, and morphological traits to generate a holistic model of tradeoffs and to understand the causes and consequences of tradeoffs in each morph.