2019 - 22nd Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

Chronic Administration of Nicotine Does Not Improve Cognitive Flexibility in an Attentional Set-Shifting Paradigm

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Abagayle L. King, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Department or Major

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Program

Location

Lillard 044

Abstract

A common way to measure cognitive flexibility is through an attentional set-shifting paradigm. Studies demonstrate that administering nicotine before the task improves performance. No studies have examined the effect of chronic administration when rats are tested drug-free. To assess the effect of prior chronic nicotine administration, daily nicotine or saline injections were given to rats across 14 days, and tests were conducted drug-free. Due to neuroplastic changes in brain reward circuits induced by repeated nicotine administration, this regimen was predicted to improve performance. However, this treatment did not influence performance, suggesting nicotine must be present at test to enhance behavior.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-9-2019 10:30 AM

End Date

4-9-2019 11:45 AM

Panel

New Frontiers in Medical Research

Panel Moderator

Jean-Marie Maddux

Field of Study for Presentation

Neuroscience, Psychology

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Apr 9th, 10:30 AM Apr 9th, 11:45 AM

Chronic Administration of Nicotine Does Not Improve Cognitive Flexibility in an Attentional Set-Shifting Paradigm

Lillard 044

A common way to measure cognitive flexibility is through an attentional set-shifting paradigm. Studies demonstrate that administering nicotine before the task improves performance. No studies have examined the effect of chronic administration when rats are tested drug-free. To assess the effect of prior chronic nicotine administration, daily nicotine or saline injections were given to rats across 14 days, and tests were conducted drug-free. Due to neuroplastic changes in brain reward circuits induced by repeated nicotine administration, this regimen was predicted to improve performance. However, this treatment did not influence performance, suggesting nicotine must be present at test to enhance behavior.