2019 - 22nd Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

Why do Attractive Males take More Risks when Searching for Mates? Testing the “Live Fast, Die Young” Hypothesis

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Christopher Edomwande, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Department or Major

Department of Biology

Location

Lillard Lobby

Abstract

Mating signals are often conspicuous and can be eavesdropped on by predators. Therefore, we expect individuals to attend to predator cues when signaling to mates. Males of the lesser waxmoth sing to attract females, but their song also attracts bat predators. Singing males respond to bat calls by freezing, but this response varies among individuals. Interestingly, attractive males take more risks. We investigate why by testing the hypothesis that attractive males have shorter lifespans. Attractive males should then benefit from taking risks that favor current reproduction versus being cautious to favor future mating opportunities.

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-9-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

4-9-2019 2:15 PM

Panel

Poster Session

Field of Study for Presentation

Biology

Event Website

https://sites.google.com/view/barbosalab/

No downloadable materials are available for this event.

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM Apr 9th, 2:15 PM

Why do Attractive Males take More Risks when Searching for Mates? Testing the “Live Fast, Die Young” Hypothesis

Lillard Lobby

Mating signals are often conspicuous and can be eavesdropped on by predators. Therefore, we expect individuals to attend to predator cues when signaling to mates. Males of the lesser waxmoth sing to attract females, but their song also attracts bat predators. Singing males respond to bat calls by freezing, but this response varies among individuals. Interestingly, attractive males take more risks. We investigate why by testing the hypothesis that attractive males have shorter lifespans. Attractive males should then benefit from taking risks that favor current reproduction versus being cautious to favor future mating opportunities.

https://publications.lakeforest.edu/gss/gss2019/program/33