2019 - 22nd Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Ralph Taylor, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Department or Major

Ralph has a major in Business and Politics

Location

Lillard 128

Abstract

This talk discusses the U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeals' decisions regarding whether police are required by 4th Amendment procedure to obtain a search warrant to search through an individual’s cell phone content. Thus far, the U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeal are in conflict—some circuits believe that a warrant is required before searching the contents of a cell phone and other circuits disagree and permit warrantless searches. This discrepancy should be a signal to the United States Supreme Court to accept a case and settle the law on this issue so that the country has uniform police procedure. A decision to permit warrantless searches potentially infringes on our rights to privacy and conversely a court decision that would require a warrant prior to a search of a cell phone would be a check on overly aggressive police work.

Presentation Type

Individual Presentation

Start Date

4-9-2019 2:30 PM

End Date

4-9-2019 3:45 PM

Panel

Rethinking Rights at the Technological Frontier

Panel Moderator

Evan Oxman

Field of Study for Presentation

Legal Studies, Politics

Included in

Law Commons

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Apr 9th, 2:30 PM Apr 9th, 3:45 PM

Warrantless Cell Phone Search and Seizure

Lillard 128

This talk discusses the U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeals' decisions regarding whether police are required by 4th Amendment procedure to obtain a search warrant to search through an individual’s cell phone content. Thus far, the U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeal are in conflict—some circuits believe that a warrant is required before searching the contents of a cell phone and other circuits disagree and permit warrantless searches. This discrepancy should be a signal to the United States Supreme Court to accept a case and settle the law on this issue so that the country has uniform police procedure. A decision to permit warrantless searches potentially infringes on our rights to privacy and conversely a court decision that would require a warrant prior to a search of a cell phone would be a check on overly aggressive police work.