2019 - 22nd Annual Steven Galovich Memorial Student Symposium

Presentation Title

Self-Pollination in Clarkia Breweri may Increase Inbreeding Depression over Generations

Student Presenter(s) and Advisor

Grant Connor, Lake Forest CollegeFollow

Department or Major

Biology

Location

Lillard Lobby

Abstract

The self-compatible plant Clarkia breweri is pollinated by hawk moths. However, hawk moths are very unreliable pollinators. Lack of natural pollinators may increase self-pollination in C. breweri resulting in inbreeding depression. Over multiple generations, recessive alleles may accumulate in C. breweri populations if hawk moth populations decline, resulting in reduced fitness for these plants. I hypothesize that seeds from inbred populations of C. breweri will have lower seed viability and growth rates than seeds from outcrossed populations.

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-9-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

4-9-2019 2:15 PM

Panel

Poster Session

Field of Study for Presentation

Biology

No downloadable materials are available for this event.

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM Apr 9th, 2:15 PM

Self-Pollination in Clarkia Breweri may Increase Inbreeding Depression over Generations

Lillard Lobby

The self-compatible plant Clarkia breweri is pollinated by hawk moths. However, hawk moths are very unreliable pollinators. Lack of natural pollinators may increase self-pollination in C. breweri resulting in inbreeding depression. Over multiple generations, recessive alleles may accumulate in C. breweri populations if hawk moth populations decline, resulting in reduced fitness for these plants. I hypothesize that seeds from inbred populations of C. breweri will have lower seed viability and growth rates than seeds from outcrossed populations.