Class Year

2018

Date

4-27-2018

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Department or Program

Philosophy

Second Department or Program

Environmental Studies

First Advisor

Janet McCracken

Second Advisor

Benjamin L. Goluboff

Third Advisor

Glenn Adelson

Abstract

This thesis examines the complexity of animal-human relationships in the contemporary United States, drawing on literature, science, and philosophy to explore the various ways that humans keep animals in captivity, such as in the instances of pet-keeping, animal research, and animal agriculture, while also having to kill them. By examining these ways of interacting with animals, an inherent duality within human consciousness is exposed. Humans both do and do not want to take responsibility for their actions regarding animals, often times resulting in humans telling themselves stories that make them feel more comfortable with these conflicting desires. The final chapter explores hunting and is used as an example of how humans can better confront this confusion toward animals. By acknowledging this duplicity of consciousness, humans are better able to confront the confusion that they feel towards animals and how this affects animals’ lives and deaths.

Language

English


Share

COinS