Class Year

2019

Date

4-17-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Department or Program

International Relations

Second Department or Program

History

First Advisor

James J. Marquardt

Second Advisor

Brian McCammack

Third Advisor

Shiwei Chen

Fourth Advisor

C. Todd Beer

Abstract

On May 7, 1999, during NATO's air war against Serbia, a U.S. bomber launched five guided missiles and destroyed a portion of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, killing three Chinese citizens and wounding 20 others, three seriously. Outraged by the incident, Chinese citizens took to the streets and attacked U.S. diplomatic buildings across China, and the Chinese government suspended cooperative endeavors with the U.S. Two decades later, the bombing's impact on contemporary Sino-American relations is alive and well. This project employs international relations theory to analyze how the bombing has positively and negatively shaped this critical bilateral relationship, focusing on the intensifying strategic rivalry, the prospects for cooperation on a range of international issues of importance to both countries, and China's determination to be treated as America's equal on the world stage.

Language

English


Included in

Asian Studies Commons

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