Class Year

2020

Date

4-16-2020

Document Type

Thesis

Distinguished Thesis

Yes

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Department or Program

Economics, Business, and Finance

First Advisor

Amanda J. Felkey

Second Advisor

Robert J. Lemke

Third Advisor

Enrique Treviño

Abstract

Public transportation is considered to be more cost-efficient and ecological than private transportation. Americans, however, use public transportation much less than citizens of European countries. How can public policy change American preferences, to increase usage of public transportation? I examine the relationship between personal characteristics (e.g., education, income, race) and public transportation usage while considering accessibility and geographic factors. In order to investigate these issues, I use the National Household Travel Survey 2009 (NHTS). Two samples of people with different access to public transportation are compared to better understand the relationship. The results show that African Americans and people in high population density areas use public transportation more often than are white Americans and people in low population areas respectively, but income has no significant effect on public transportation use. These results match most previous studies on public transportation. In conclusion, the policy should improve public transportation network systemwide, but simple-aimed gasoline taxes are predicted to be ineffective.

Language

English


Share

COinS